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Thursday, 29 July 2010

Well I suppose it's update time so soon already

A few months ago my friend on the Lizard point gave me a plant from her garden it was growing in profusion with lots of spiky leaves and long stems with large ball shaped clusters of beautiful blue flowers. I took it home in a plastic bag no pot or little in the way of earth around the roots, I left it on the doorstep and forgot about it. A while later unannoynced she came to visit and to my horror the plastic bag was still on the doorstep with the plant inside. She was garcious enought not to mention it but I froze on the spot.

After she had gone I decided to plant it in a large pot and left it by the front door it was there all through the winter months and I thought it had died. But look at it now.. a lovely plant has blossomed where a dank yellowy weed once was.
Does anyone know what it's called?

5 comments:

tilly said...

Hello Peter
Well I cannot help with the name for your plant, but it beautiful, what a determined and hardy little plant it is to survive your treatment and the harsh snowy winter. When you look at it, it should remind you never to give up on what life throws at you. lol
Tilly xx

Margarets designer cards said...

Hi Peter,

You are so lucky its Agapanthus or African lily, they do not like frost and need to be kept somewhere in the winter where the forst does not get them, I lost mine during the winter, they are very expensive plants/bulbs. In the garden centre on sunday they were £7.99 for a small one, they come in several colours including white, and shades of blue. Enjoy Margaret

Noreen said...

Hi Peter, I see Margaret has answered before I saw your post. Agapanthus are beautiful. I cover mine in a pile of straw each autumn, & so far it has been fine - even with the extreme weather we had last winter. Enjoy the show it produces each year x

Jenny said...

Hi Peter, its certainly an Agapanthus! You are lucky to grow such a magnificent specimen in this country. I could grow the smaller, insignificant varieties when living in the north, but they rarely survived the winter unless I took them to bed with me! Your blog is great. Jenny

peter said...

Please to report my lovely Agapanthus has survived the move to Sussex and has pride of place on the patio table in our south facing garden. Despite being left out all winter in the snow last year we had eleven flowers and this year we had seven heads . So I must be doing something right.